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Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
Or maybe Alive would be the more appropriate movie considering these are soccer kids.

Not sure if anyone else has been following this story but it's pretty wild. An entire soccer team and their coach went into a cave ten days ago and were trapped by heavy rains. There have been teams of divers and experts from all over trying to find them and some Brits finally managed it. They're about two and a half miles underground and the crazy thing is they're not out of the woods caves yet.

Turns out a lot of these kids can't swim and will have to be taken out one by one through what's basically fast moving liquid mud with zero visibility. This would be to be insanely dangerous for a professional diver even without dragging a flailing little boy along, so the other option they're considering will be to keep them supplied down there for literal months until the waters recede. With the risk of more flooding coming along and drowning them the entire time that's obviously not ideal either even before you factor in the idea of living months underground.

Pretty sure if this were the US we'd just blow the fucking mountain open or something but hopefully they can figure something out over there regardless.

This will absolutely be made into a movie if these kids survive, and I imagine it's pretty much hell to be that coach right now in particular even though this would appear to be all his fault unless those sudden rains were REALLY damn sudden and not predicted at all.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44692813

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
Yeah, I read the one diver said it was like swimming through black coffee. Saw something that said the actual exit was only like a half mile away, through flooded caverns of course though. Don't want to make it too easy.

I'm surprised they put out such a big rescue effort, honestly. Perks of being kids I guess.

Send in Aquaman with a 2,500 foot zipline cord, carabiners, harnesses, and oxygen I guess.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago

This is nerve-wracking. I hope they all get out safely. I will pray for them.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago

I think they're worried that if they try and blow it up to get everyone out from the top, that the cave will just collapse and crush them. 

And I worried that if they leave them in there until the caves un-flood that they would run out of oxygen but apparently they've got some sort of contraption just pumping the oxygen in to them. 

It's a crazy story, but if it's "flood season" how the hell were they stupid enough to go in there and not expect to be trapped? (obviously I don't know enough about Thai weather to be judging but it seems like an act of stupidity to me.)

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
They're also trying to pump the water out to at least give them a slight buffer against future flooding, but I'm not sure how much good it will do in practice.

But an adult taking a bunch of somebody else's kids into a cave by himself would be borderline criminal stupidity/endangerment even minus the rain or ability to look at a forecast.

I'm sure he's spent the last couple weeks beating himself up about this and the important thing right now is getting them all out, but yes I suspect they're going to be taking a pretty hard look at him and thete are going to be a lot of parents out for blood.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
First death of a rescue team member. Guess it was only a matter of time. Seeing how they keep flip flopping on the extraction timeline, can’t say operation command is showing top notch competence. First rule of search and rescue, don’t get yourself killed in the attempt.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
Hadn't read that yet. That fucking sucks. I suppose the risks are part of the job but that does not bode well for the actually getting the kids out part.

Honestly don't think anybody could blame them if they just kind of accidentally forgot to rescue the coach once/if the kids get out.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
A breakthrough!



Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago

8 boys rescued now! 4 boys and the coach are still in the cave. The 8 rescued are in quarantined in a hospital in case they have an infection from the bar droppings in the cave.  It was the weakest boys taken out first. 

 

 

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago
Honestly it's going better than I expected.

Hope no one on site is dumb enough to say something like that though or they'll jinx the hell out of themselves for real.

Thai kids found; did not reenact Lord of Flies

9 months ago

Water is scary

9 months ago
Came across a really good article from 2005 that kind of illustrates some of the difficulties of cave diving and how quickly things can go wrong. This was a guy trying to retrieve the body of another diver in an extremely deep underwater cave (he died in the attempt, and then the guy who went to try and retrieve his body nearly did too) so not quite comparable to the rescue worker that was helping the Thai kids, but this is as good a thread as any to leave it in. https://www.outsideonline.com/1922711/raising-dead

I'd really recommend reading the whole thing, but it's pretty long so here's a couple excerpts:



The picture is dark, and sometimes hard to see. But along with the sounds of Shaw's breathing, picked up with perfect clarity by the camera in the stillness of the cave, the video tells the tale of Shaw's final moments. When Shaw reaches the body of Deon Dreyer, he is 12 minutes and 22 seconds into the dive, and he's been on the bottom for just over a minute. He pulls the body bag out and starts to try and work it over Deon's legs. As he does, a cloud of silt obscures the picture. When it clears, Deon's body, its head having fallen off, is floating in front of Shaw.

This was totally unexpected. Deon, as it turned out, was not completely skeletal, and he was no longer stuck in the silt. Instead of decomposing, his corpse had mummified into a soaplike composition that gave it mass and neutral buoyancy. And for some reason—no one has an explanation—the body had become unstuck from the mud as soon as Shaw started working on it. "The fact that the body was now loose, and not pinned to the ground, was not one of the scenarios that we had thought about," Shirley sighs. "The body was not meant to be floating." It's a lot easier to slip a bag over an immobile body than a body floating and rolling in front of you at 886 feet.

Shaw starts fumbling and, for the first time, lets out an audible grunt of effort. Herbst, listening intently through headphones, heard the steadily increasing distress in Shaw's breathing and knew there was trouble coming. "Breathe slower, man, breathe slower," he urged out loud. Watching the video with a clear head, it is hard not to wonder why Shaw didn't just turn around right then and abandon the dive. In October, he had turned for the surface as soon as his breathing rate increased. Now he was panting, and Deon, who was attached to the cave line, was floating free. The body could have been pulled up. "All the options involved putting the bag on," Shirley explains. "He's sticking with his plan. Which is what you've got to do." Still, when Shirley first saw the video, he couldn't stop himself from pleading, "Leave it, leave it, leave the body now. It's loose and can come up."

Shaw, however, is responding only to the pounding of his narcosis and his determination to finish the job. He keeps working to control the body, letting go of his cave light so he can use both hands. Deon is rolling and turning in front of him, resisting Shaw's efforts to get him into the bag. Shaw has been at it for two minutes, and the cave line is seemingly everywhere. It snags on his cave light, and Shaw pauses to clear it.
At this, Shirley and Herbst bridled. A cave diver should never let gear float loose. "It's a recipe for disaster," says Shirley, who will always regret not being present when Shaw told Hiles he would put the light to the side at times. "Do not do that," he would have warned him.

Now Shaw is acting confused. He is working at the torso, instead of the feet. His movements have lost purpose. After more than two and a half minutes of work—and three minutes and 49 seconds on the bottom—Shaw pulls his shears out, fumbling to open them. The plan was for him to cut the dive tanks away as he rolled the bag over Deon. Shaw's breathing rate continues to increase. Suddenly he loses his footing on the sloping bottom. He scrambles back to the body in a cloud of silt. The grunts of effort, hateful little bursts of sound, are painfully frequent.

Shirley and Herbst guess that Shaw's narcosis was then closer to six or seven martinis. "You focus on the one thing. You don't focus on the dive anymore," Herbst says. "The one thing becomes everything. And I think with Dave it became the body, the body, the body."

Still, Shaw keeps checking the time on his dive computer. After five and a half minutes on the bottom, he's aware enough to know he has to leave, but he doesn't get far. The video shows the bottom moving beneath him. Then Shaw's forward progress stops. His errant cave light has apparently snagged the cave line tied to Deon's tanks. Shaw knows he has caught something and turns awkwardly. His breathing starts to sound desperate. He pulls at the cat's cradle of cave line, as if trying to sort it out. Every breath is now a sharp grunt. Shaw struggles to move forward again but is anchored by the weight of Deon's body. The shears are still in his hand, but he never cuts anything. The pace of his breathing keeps accelerating, and there is a tragic, gasping quality to it, so painful to listen to that Herbst and Shirley will no longer watch the video with sound.
Twenty-one minutes into the dive, the sounds finally start to fade. Dave Shaw, with carbon dioxide suffusing his lungs, is starting to pass out. He is dying. It's heartbreaking to watch. A minute later there is no movement.



******



Okay and...is it just me, or is this a little, um...

"Ten days after Bushman's Hole gave the bodies back, Theo and Marie Dreyer went to see their son. When the morgue attendant asked them to step in, Marie wasn't sure what to expect. When she saw a fully fleshed-out body, her tears stopped, and she felt happy. There was no head, but lying in front of her was her boy. Theo marveled that Deon's legs still held their athletic shape. Marie couldn't believe he was still in his Jockey underwear. "We saw him," she explains, her eyes shining. Overwhelmed, she stepped forward and took her dead son in her arms."



Like I have a ton of sympathy for this woman and I'm glad she got a real funeral for her son, but at some point that's hard to define, that got a little weird.

Water is scary

9 months ago
Also, there's still a lot on this I haven't read, but I heard second hand that one kid on the team got picked up by his mom and went home while the coach was telling the others 'hey let's go in this pitch dark cave, I bet it will be fun!'

Can anybody confirm because lol