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Question about dialogue preferences

16 days ago

When you're reading/playing a storygame, how much freedom do you prefer when it comes to dialogue? Would you rather pick everything the character you play says? Have more generic responses (i.e. 'witty response', 'sarcastic response', etc.)? Just picking one question or comment to 'trigger' an entire conversation? Something else I haven't mentioned here?

Question about dialogue preferences

16 days ago
Key decisions represented as specific lines might work, but I don't think you can realistically expect to tie everything a character says to a choice, so I'd go with the conversation trigger.

Something like
1.) Agree.
2.) Refuse.
3.) Tell them you'll think about it.

Followed by the actual dialogue on the next page or else at least an implied conversation is more how I've usually seen these kinds of choices represented.

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago

It is possible, just very difficult. Also, the dialogue doesn’t have to have a major effect on the story (unless that is what the author wants).

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago

:) That is a very interesting question. I think it depends on what type of story you would like to see.

I suspect most people like a lot of options in a choose-your-path story, but that requires a tremendous amount of work to construct all the paths that follow each choice. The more generic responses can be a lot of fun sometimes. The question or comment that “triggers” a conversation (which mizal elaborated on very tersely) is probably the easiest to do.

I believe your opinion is more important than mine, because your best writing will be when you are writing what you want to read. People can sense when an author is having fun.

For me, I’m happy when I’m reading an awesome story where at least one path is one I would want to choose (I’m partial to the “good guy” path).

If you are still not sure which style you like best you could write samples of each to yourself and see which one makes you smile. Also, you could check out some of the awesome storygames on this site for inspiration. You gotta check out BerkaZerka and Ogre 11’s work! They’re awesome!!!

P.S. I wish you well on your story, and I hope you had an awesome Easter!

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago
From what I've seen and read here, the majority of readers would prefer to be immersed in the story. In other words, they would want to actually read the words the character says and NOT things like "witty response" that take them out of the story.

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago

SHOW us it's a witty response, don't tell us, ffs people

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago
Sarah asks if you would like to try her tuna that she brought for lunch.

You make a witty response and end up married, having five children together.

The End.

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago
"Daddy, what was it like when you asked out mommy?"

Ah, I remember that...years ago at the staffing firm...

"Lunch time, finally. I can't wait to see Sarah."


"Afternoon Sarah. How's lunch today?"

"It's really good - I bought some fancy tuna and by fancy I mean $1 more than the usual. Tastes great, wanna try?"

"Haha [witty response]."

Back then, when she bit her lip after I said such a terrible line...I knew she was for me.

"Daddy?"

"Well sweetie, it was a very romantic and happy moment for both of us."

Question about dialogue preferences

15 days ago
I prefer to offer specific dialogue options that sound in-character for the person you are playing as. This means the choices would be written as dialogue. That being said, it is unnecessary to do this every time your character opens his/her mouth, especially if they are having an extensive conversation with another person. There should occasionally be options to respond in ways that would shift the conversation, or answer direct questions, but otherwise I would recommend offering several things for the character to say that express different tones, and adjust the tone of the conversation according to the player's response.